In Other News

LA County has its own hepatitis A outbreak

City News Service|

Healthcare: Uninsured rate in US falls to record low of 8.8%

Three years after the Affordable Care Act’s coverage expansion took effect, the number of Americans without health insurance fell to 28.1 million in 2016, down from 29 million in 2015, according to a federal report released Tuesday. The l...

By Phil Galewitz California Healthline|

MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Public health

    Cockroaches shut down 2 Whittier restaurants

    Two restaurants in Whittier were temporarily closed last week due to major public health hazards. Between Aug. 20 and Aug. 26, those facilities had their health permits suspended for cockroach infestations, according to a report from the Los Angeles County Public Health Department. Restaurants and markets whose permits are suspended must close until another inspection determines the problems have been fixed. Closures can occur during routine and owner-initiated inspections,...

    Stephanie K. Baer
    |

  • Gene therapy

    Leukemia-fighting gene therapy has ups (it usually works) and downs (you won’t believe what it costs, side effects are brutal)

    WASHINGTON — Opening a new era in cancer care, U.S. health officials have approved a breakthrough treatment that genetically engineers patients’ own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. The Food and Drug Administration said the approval on Wednesday was historic, the first gene therapy to hit the U.S. market. Made from scratch for every patient, it’s one of a wave of “living drugs” under development to fight...

    By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer|

  • Wildlife

    Is there a Maury for mountain lions? Asking for two adorable LA kittens

    Two blue-eyed mountain lion kittens born to a young mother and a father that gets around were found earlier this month in the Santa Monica Mountains, marking the 13th litter discovered by researchers in the area, officials announced Tuesday. The female and male siblings have been dubbed P-59 and P-60, and were discovered by National Park Service and California Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists. The kittens will now be part of a long-term study by the National Park Service on...

    Susan Abram
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  • Public health

    What happens when you’re forced to change health plans when you’re sick?

    Joanna Joshua, 39, panicked when she opened a letter from her family’s insurer, Cigna, only to learn it was pulling out of California’s individual market next year. The Santa Clarita resident would have no choice but to change health plans. “What am I going to do?” Joshua wondered. Her 2-year-old daughter, Jasmine Winning, needs heart surgery next year because of a rare disease she’s had since birth. The toddler has had two heart operations...

    By Pauline Bartolone California Healthline|

  • Seniors

    Successful Aging: It all depends on how you look at the greatness of 80

    Q I am 79 years old and soon will be celebrating my 80th birthday. Although I am grateful to have lived this long I feel so different about this birthday. I recently dreamed that I was about to wander through an arch and at the last minute stopped, which is when I woke up with heart palpitations. Turning 80 makes me nervous. Could you speculate reasons for my apprehension in addition to the fact that for a woman, 80 is seriously getting old? — S.J. A Dear...

    Helen Dennis
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  • Police

    La Habra Police Department officers better equipped for opioid overdoses

    The La Habra Police Department has a small, but potentially life-saving new tool to use in the field. Officers now carry a pouch containing a Narcan nasal spray that blocks and reverses the effects of opioid overdoses. The spray takes from one to three minutes to kick in, but the effects last as long as 90 minutes, which gives plenty of time for paramedics to arrive on scene and take over care, Lt. Mel Ruiz said. One spray is usually all that is required to combat the...

    By Anthony Mendoza anmendoza@scng.com|

  • News

    Home visits help new parents overcome tough histories, raise healthy children

    EL CENTRO >> Seated at a kitchen table in a cramped apartment, Rosendo Gil asked the young parents sitting across from him what they should do if their daughter caught a cold. Blas Lopez, 29, and his fiancée, Lluvia Padilla, 28, quickly answered: Check her temperature and call the doctor if she has a fever they can’t control. “I’m very proud of both of you knowing what to do,” Gil said, as 3-year-old Leilanie Lopez played with a pretend...

    By Anna Gorman California Healthline|

  • Childhood learning disorders

    Dyslexia, once the reading disability that shall not be named, comes into its own in California

    Jamie Bennetts created a spreadsheet of every child’s reading scores in the small Knightsen Elementary School District a few summers ago, identified the laggers and greeted them in the fall with state-adopted reading interventions. She was new to her job as a reading interventionist, a position she sought after the unnerving experience of teaching 7th-graders, many of whom she’d taught as 1st- or 2nd-graders, and discovering that the 6- and 7-year-olds she’d known as...

    By Jane Meredith Adams EdSource|

  • Hospital and clinic services

    Anthem, MemorialCare end stalemate that left thousands of Long Beach patients in lurch

    MemorialCare Health System and Anthem Blue Cross have reached a multi-year contract agreement, officials announced Friday afternoon, ending a stalemate that affected thousands of Long Beach area patients. Talks between the insurance provider and hospital system – which operates Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, Miller...

    Melissa Evans
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  • Food safety

    Rodent droppings, cockroaches, lack of hot water lead to closures at 3 San Gabriel Valley restaurants

    Three restaurants in the San Gabriel Valley were temporarily closed last week due to major public health hazards. Between Aug. 13 to Aug. 19, those facilities had their health permits suspended for cockroach and rodent infestations and a lack of hot water, according to a report from the Los Angeles County Public Health Department. Restaurants and markets whose permits are suspended must close until another inspection determines the problems have been fixed. Closures can occur...

    Stephanie K. Baer
    |

The Whittier Daily News: BLOGS