In Other News

Gardening: Here’s why you probably will never see a naturally blue flower

By Joshua Siskin|

Gardening: Iris has a colorful history, forgiving nature

When the mob overthrew the monarchy during the French Revolution, one of the first acts of the new governing authority was to remove the flower that had been visible for centuries on flags, shields, decorative patches and coats of arms. This flower, ...

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MOST RECENT STORIES

  • Home & Garden

    5 garden tips for this week, Aug. 19-25

    Morning watering is best Hopefully we all know that judicious watering is absolutely essential this time of year. Keep in mind that container plants dry out quickly, and citrus and avocado trees need regular soil moisture for fruit to develop properly. It’s always best to irrigate as early in the morning as possible so water has a chance to seep into the soil. Try never to water on a hot or breezy afternoon, because much of it evaporates without helping your...

    Jack Christensen
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  • Home & Garden

    How to determine which fruit trees will grow best in your yard

    If you have a fruit tree or two, there’s one branch of science, despite its unfamiliar name, which you probably know something about. The science to which I refer is phenology. Phenology is the study of recurring biological phenomena, such as bird migrations and blossoming of plants and how these phenomena are affected by climate and seasonal weather. These phenomena may also serve to predict the weather in the days and weeks ahead or, by the same token, the weather during a...

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  • Home & Garden

    Growing young gardeners

    Gardening can prove fruitful for all ages, especially inquisitive youngsters, who routinely are told not to touch or get their hands dirty. It can be enlightening, too. “Kids need to see where our food actually comes from,” said Don Delano, longtime horticulturist at the Fairplex in Pomona. “Too many adults even have no concept of how food goes from the farm to the store to home. “When children are at the Farm (located at Fairplex) for a field trip and...

    Suzanne Sproul
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  • Gardening

    Drought may be over, but war on turf continues

    For those interested in water conservation, it’s time to get tough on turf. That’s right. Douse it with earth-friendly herbicides, suffocate it with plastic, sheet mulch it to death with newspaper/cardboard or dig the whole thing up. Whichever deadly method you choose, turf removal is a great way to conserve water and save money. “Conservation is still the cheapest and best way to ensure our water viability,” said Ray Hiemstra, associate director of...

    Suzanne Sproul
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  • Home & Garden

    There’s still time to grow and harvest a corn crop this summer

    It’s already August, but it’s still possible to plant corn. You can thank the efforts of New England Indian tribes for this late summer option for your vegetable garden. Having received their first corn through trade with Indian tribes inhabiting the warmer Southeast, around 1,000 years ago, the New England tribes were eager to develop quick-ripening varieties that would be suitable for their shorter growing season. To this end, they planted seed (kernels) from ears that...

    Joshua Siskin
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  • Home & Garden

    5 garden tips for this week, Aug. 5-11

    The next harvest Plant tomatoes now for autumn harvest and prepare a garden spot for winter vegetables. Blend in plenty of homemade compost or other organic matter for best results. Begin planting winter garden vegetables before the end of August. These include beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbages, carrots, cauliflower, celery, kale, leeks, lettuces, peas, radishes and turnips. By the end of September you can add bulbs, such as garlic and onions, and also...

    Jack Christensen
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  • Home & Garden

    Gardening: Persimmon trees are rewarding — and not just for the fruit

    If you are seeking a medium-sized shade tree, around 30 feet tall with a 30-foot spread, possessing unusually ornamental and gustatory qualities, consider the persimmon (Diospyros kaki). Although its fruit are Halloween orange and hard to miss, the persimmon tree generally flies under the radar when backyard fruit tree selection is under discussion. This is a shame since persimmon fruit are highly rewarding to grow. They are not known as God’s fruit (Dios = God, pyros = fruit)...

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  • Home decor

    Melamine, touted for its durability and versatility, is making a comeback

    Matched china sets and crisp ironed napkins aren’t making as many guest lists this summer. Instead, particularly for outdoor gatherings, the latest hostess craze is setting the table with melamine, that oh-so-familiar sight from the past. The trend of curating (designing table settings), embraced by everyone from decorating legend Mary Emmerling to Southern California party planners, caught on some time ago. Now there’s an added twist — freshening up tables by...

    Suzanne Sproul
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  • Entertainment

    6 things to see and do at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont

    You can spend hours at the expansive Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, walking its trails, examining its impressive flora and simply relaxing. But in case you don’t have the time to spare, there are some definite “don’t misses” at the Claremont venue. Our “Things To See” series continues with a look at the garden started in 1927 by Susanna Bixby Bryant. She set aside 200 acres of her family’s Orange County ranch for the garden. Her...

    Suzanne Sproul
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  • Home decor

    Bamboo sheets, pillows and even mattresses touted for eco-friendliness and comfort

    Mattresses aren’t the only things to consider in the quest for a good night’s sleep. Bedding also can play a key role. All things cotton, a very popular natural fiber, are traditional summer go-tos, but there’s buzz about bamboo joining the ranks as a popular choice for some “cool” bedding/products. When outside temperatures recently hovered around 121 degrees in Palm Desert and remained sizzling throughout the evening, Danette Ferro and her...

    Suzanne Sproul
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